Mediterranean Salad Bowl

mediterranean salad bowl

My mom and I made these together last night and they turned out WAY better than either of us expected. We started by gathering lettuce (which you can barely even see with all these goods on top!), mint, and edible flowers from our garden and walked back up to the kitchen to put it all together. Standard restaurant salads are often lacking many essential nutrients that complete a meal. Although many times they are designed to be had as a precursor to a meal, many people order them as their main course and miss out on a lot of vitamins, minerals, and nutrients.

Micronutrients are essential for life. Although we need them in very small amounts, we need them to survive. They help us produce enzymes, hormones, and other substances that are essential for proper growth and development. Our diet (with the exception of vitamin D from the sun and trace elements that can enter through our skin) is our main supplier of essential vitamins and minerals. A good rule of thumb is to eat the rainbow. Vitamins and minerals show up in plant foods in a variety of colors (for example, beta-carotene found in yellow and orange plants that change to vitamin A once in the body and vitamin C typically found in red, purple, and blue plants). Creating a colorful array of vegetables (or fruits!) on your plate makes sure you are getting a variety of vitamins and minerals all within one meal.

mediterranean salad bowl

It is very common in the U.S, and now around the world, to have vitamin and mineral deficiencies even though people are overfed. This is due to the lack of micronutrients in the diet of billions of people. Fast food and processed foods have little natural micronutrients leaving their consumers heavily deficient, yet overfed. Many of these foods are fortified with vitamins and minerals, yet our population is still heavily deficient in many of the essential nutrients needed for proper growth and development. So you tell me, are they getting enough vitamins and minerals from fortified foods? Or would it be better to eat natural foods to ensure adequate intake?

mediterranean salad bowl

This bowl, however, packs a nutritional punch with all the colors, variety, seasonings, and combination of raw and cooked ingredients. With broccoli, cucumber, rosemary garbanzo beans, red peppers, balsamic onions, kalamata olives, and garlic rosemary potatoes, we definitely got a variety of vitamins and minerals in our meal while satisfying our taste buds.

Mediterranean Salad Bowl
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Hearty Mediterranean salad bowl with a variety of vegetables.
Author:
Recipe type: Salad
Cuisine: Mediterranean
Serves: 45
Ingredients
  • 1 head lettuce or salad greens depending on preference
  • 1 head steamed broccoli
  • 12-15 small Yukon gold potatoes
  • 1 Persian cucumber, sliced
  • 1 sliced red onion
  • 1-2tbsp white vinegar
  • 1 15oz. can of garbanzo beans
  • 1 large red onion
  • 10-15 pitted kalamata olives
  • ¼ cup sliced red cabbage
  • 5 fresh and chopped mint leaves
  • 3 sprigs of fresh rosemary
  • 3 tbsp olive oil
  • 1tsp garlic powder
  • 1tsp Himalayan pink salt
  • 1tbsp Dijon mustard
  • Juice of 2 lemons
  • 2tbsp Muscat vinegar (can substitute with other types of vinegar)
  • Equal parts olive oil for dressing
Instructions
  1. Heat oven to 375 degrees on convection
  2. Rinse and place garbanzo beans on foil on a baking pan and cover with olive oil, ¼ tsp salt and 1 chopped sprig of rosemary and bake for 30 minutes
  3. Rinse and chop lettuce and add to bowls
  4. Rinse and steam broccoli on the stove until slightly tender
  5. Rinse and slice potatoes and sautee them on the stove with 1½ tbsp olive oil, 1 sprig of rinsed and chopped fresh rosemary, ¼tsp of sea salt and garlic powder- cook until golden brown on both sides
  6. Sautee sliced red onion in a little olive oil on the stove in a small frying pan and add white vinegar
  7. Add cucumber, mint, peppers, and olives to salad bowls
  8. Let broccoli, onions, potatoes, and garbanzo beans cool for at least 5 minutes before placing on salads to prevent wilting
  9. Make salad dressing by combining Dijon mustard, lemon juice, Muscat vinegar (or vinegar of your choice) in a mason jar and shaking, add equal parts olive oil to the dressing and shake
  10. Add broccoli, onions, potatoes, and garbanzo beans to salad bowls, dress and enjoy!

Information for this post was found in:

Malnutrition. (2017). World Health Organization. Retrieved from http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/malnutrition/en/

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